Accessibility Links

Interview Advice

 

No doubt everyone you speak with will have advice about how best to interview. We have seen many people utilise a variety of approaches successfully, some are conservative and others are highly risky. However, on the whole there are a few basic rules you can follow that will ensure you are received well by the interviewer.

 

Rule 1 – Presentation

It may seem obvious, but this is where many people get it wrong. For a more conservative business always wear a dark suit or skirt and jacket, light business shirt or blouse, plain tie and dark, polished shoes. If the company is on the more casual side of things always err on the side of too smart. You can always adjust for a second interview. If you are unsure – check with your consultant.

Rule 2 – Prepare

We are constantly amazed at how little some people prepare for their interview. You wouldn't go on a client meeting or into a one to one with your manager without having done some research and preparation - the same applies to interviewing.

Additionally, make sure you know what your own CV has on it and that you understand your achievements and performance in previous positions. There is nothing that destroys an interview quicker than when you can't relay basic information about previous roles. Make sure you know what your objectives were, what you achieved, and anything else that demonstrates what you have done and how successful you have been.

Rule 3 - The first Impression

As the saying goes; “you only get one chance to make a first impression”. Look good, feel good and believe you will be successful. Use a firm hand shake (even the ladies) and thank your interviewer for the opportunity to meet with them. Don't forget to smile – it relaxes everybody. Often your interviewer may be just as nervous as you.

Rule 4 - 2 Ears, 1 Mouth - Use them in proportion

A good interview is about gathering information from the interviewer in order to present yourself as the solution to their current problem. Therefore, use the interview to get information about the interviewer and their business. Try to make the meeting a business discussion rather than a question and answer session. Remember, most people like talking about themselves and their achievements so ask your interviewer questions about themselves and their role. Their answers will give you a flavour of what type of person they will be looking for and the type of company it is you would be working for.

Rule 5 (For Sales Roles) - Know Your Figures

You are a Sales Professional. A successful Sales Professional knows their figures inside and out. Make sure you are able to articulate your activity in terms of number of calls, appointments and ratios. Know your order values and targets and most importantly, know what you achieved. The most common complaint we receive from clients is when candidates don’t know their figures.

Rule 6 - Avoid the Cliché

Whilst often a cliché best describes a situation, try to avoid using them in an interview environment. You want the interviewer to find out who you are and what you can do for them and therefore you need to voice your own ideas, not regurgitate someone else's.

Rule 7 - Close the Meeting

Regardless of whether you are interviewing for a position as Sales Director,  SEO Specialist, Marketing Manager or C+ Developer, you must close the interview. If, when you leave the interview, you don't know what the interviewer thought of you, or whether they had any concerns, you haven't done the job properly. Closing can be as simple as asking the interviewer what they thought of you, or to establish the next step in the process and clarify whether you will be included.