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Less Recruitment, More Consultant!

Posted by: Justin Byrne
15/03/2018
With the ongoing and rapid development of more and more intricate recruitment technologies, it's very easy to get caught up in the technology whirlwind and forget what makes us great as a recruiter. Whilst undoubtedly technology can prove useful within the recruitment cycle, it's not what makes us great and it's not the reason our clients will buy from us. Equally, with the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) & related technology in recruitment, it's likely that a portion of the recruitment process will become automated in the coming years and thus available to recruiting organisations directly.

The way to remain valuable to clients is to be able to offer something that technology will never be able to provide - knowledge. So often we forget that our job title is made up of two words, not one. And that second word represents the piece that your clients will want to buy, over and over again. 'Consultant' is defined as; "a professional who provides expert advice in a particular area...". It's the expert advice that you give, the way you interpret market data, your understanding of how to manage an effective process in a competitive market etc etc etc that gives you value and allows you to charge fairly for your service and knowledge.

Don't Ask for Business, Offer Expertise!

If you're attempting to improve your client base, or feel there is more potential in it, the way to success is to start acting like the expert you are. Sit back, think and recognise the sheer volume of knowledge you have and how that knowledge could genuinely help your clients to achieve their objectives. Then start to offer it, for nothing and with no agenda. You'll quickly find you are able to properly engage with people who want to listen to what you have to say. In turn, you'll soon find yourself having to decide which projects to work on and how to manage your time to get the most out of the huge opportunity in front of you!
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